Program Mapping
Boy Scouts of America

This program mapping shows how actions, advancement and activities in the Boy Scouts of America program can be applied to the LDS Church's Children and Youth programme and vice versa. These are recommendations only and should not be considered either authoritative or complete. The new church program is open ended and family driven. This means that a family or youth could choose to complete parts of the program using scouting. The advantage here is that scouting provides activities which are age appropriate and well defined with can help youth and families in developing a program best suited for their own needs and the age of the youth.

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In addition to the mappings given below we have also set out a suggested mappings for the BSA merit badge program as well. See. BSA Merit Badge page.

Boy Scouts of America Children and Youth
Scout rank badgeScout Rank
1a. Repeat from memory the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan. In your own words, explain their meaning. Spiritual or Social
1b. Explain what Scout spirit is. Describe some ways you have shown Scout spirit by practicing the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan. Spiritual or Social
1c. Demonstrate the Scout sign, salute, and handshake. Explain when they should be used. Educational or Social
1d. Describe the First Class Scout badge and tell what each part stands for. Explain the significance of the First Class Scout badge. Educational or Social
1e. Repeat from memory the Outdoor Code. In your own words, explain what the Outdoor Code means to you. Educational or Social
1f. Repeat from memory the Pledge of Allegiance. In your own words, explain its meaning. Social
2a. Describe how the Scouts in the troop provide its leadership. Social
2b. Describe the four steps of Scout advancement. Educational
2c. Describe the Scouts BSA ranks and how they are earned. Educational
2d. Describe what merit badges are and how they are earned. Educational
3a. Explain the patrol method. Describe the types of patrols that are used in your troop. Social
3b. Become familiar with your patrol name, emblem, flag, and yell. Explain how these items create patrol spirit. Social
4a. Show how to tie a square knot, two half-hitches, and a taut-line hitch. Explain how each knot is used. Educational
4b. Show the proper care of a rope by learning how to whip and fuse the ends of different kinds of rope. Educational
5a. Tell what you need to know about pocketknife safety. Educational
6a. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide and earn the Cyber Chip Award for your grade. Educational, Social or Spiritual
7a. Since joining the troop and while working on Scout rank, participate in a Scoutmaster conference. Social
Scout rank badgeTenderfoot Tenderfoot rank could be an educational, social or physical goal in and of itself or parts of the requirements could meed various other goals.
1a. Present yourself to your leader, prepared for an overnight camping trip. Show the personal and camping gear you will use. Show the right way to pack and carry it. Educational
1b. Spend at least one night on a patrol or troop campout. Sleep in a tent you have helped pitch. Educational, Physical
1c. Tell how you practiced the Outdoor Code on a campout or outing. Educational
2a. On the campout, assist in preparing one of the meals. Tell why it is important for each patrol member to share in meal preparation and cleanup. Educational Social
2b. While on a campout, demonstrate an appropriate method of safely cleaning items used to prepare, serve, and eat a meal. Educational
2c. Explain the importance of eating together as a patrol. Social
3a.-3d. Knots, knife and ax requirements. Educational
4a.-4d. First Aid requirements Educational
5a. Explain the importance of the buddy system as it relates to your personal safety on outings and in your neighborhood. Use the buddy system while on a troop or patrol outing. Educational Social
5b. Describe what to do if you become lost on a hike or campout. Educational
5c. Explain the rules of safe hiking, both on the highway and cross-country, during the day and at night. Educational
6a.-6c. Physical improvement requirements. Physical
7a. Demonstrate how to display, raise, lower, and fold the U.S. flag. Educational Social
7b. Participate in a total of one hour of service in one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout slogan and Scout motto. Social Service
8a. Describe the steps in Scouting's Teaching EDGE method. Use the Teaching EDGE method to teach another person how to tie the square knot. Educational
9a. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law in your everyday life. Spiritual
Scout rank badgeecond Class econd Class rank could be an educational, social or physical goal in and of itself or parts of the requirements could meed various other goals.
1a. Since joining Scouts BSA, participate in five separate troop/patrol activities, at least three of which must be held outdoors. Of the outdoor activities, at least two must include overnight camping. These activities do not include troop or patrol meetings. On campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect, such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee. Educational, Physical
1b. Explain the principles of Leave No Trace and tell how you practiced them on a campout or outing. This outing must be different from the one used for Tenderfoot requirement 1c. Educational
1c. On one of these campouts, select a location for your patrol site and recommend it to your patrol leader, senior patrol leader, or troop guide. Explain what factors you should consider when choosing a patrol site and where to pitch a tent. Educational, Social
2a.-2g. This is a general camping requirement with a number of educational activities. Educational
3a.-3d. Compass and hiking safety. Educational
4a. Identify or show evidence of at least 10 kinds of wild animals (such as birds, mammals, reptiles, fish, or mollusks) found in your local area or camping location. You may show evidence by tracks, signs, or photographs you have taken. Educational
5a.-5d. Swimming safety and test Educational Physical
6a.-6e. First Aid requirements. Educational Physical
7a. After completing Tenderfoot requirement 6c, be physically active at least 30 minutes each day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities. Physical
7b. Share your challenges and successes in completing Second Class requirement 7a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life and develop a plan for doing so. Social
7c. Participate in a school, community, or troop program on the dangers of using drugs, alcohol, and tobacco and other practices that could be harmful to your health. Discuss your participation in the program with your family, and explain the dangers of substance addictions. Report to your Scoutmaster or other adult leader in your troop about which parts of the Scout Oath and Scout Law relate to what you learned. Educational Social
8a. Participate in a flag ceremony for your school, religious institution, chartered organization, community, or Scouting activity. Social
8b. Explain what respect is due the flag of the United States. Educational
8c. With your parents or guardian, decide on an amount of money that you would like to earn, based on the cost of a specific item you would like to purchase. Develop a written plan to earn the amount agreed upon and follow that plan; it is acceptable to make changes to your plan along the way. Discuss any changes made to your original plan and whether you met your goal. Educational, Social, Spiritual (tithing)
8d. At a minimum of three locations, compare the cost of the item for which you are saving to determine the best place to purchase it. After completing Second Class requirement 8c, decide if you will use the amount that you earned as originally intended, save all or part of it, or use it for another purpose. Educational
8e. Participate in two hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Tell how your service to others relates to the Scout Oath. Service
9a. Explain the three R's of personal safety and protection. Educational
9b. Describe bullying; tell what the appropriate response is to someone who is bullying you or another person. Social Spiritual
10. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law (not to include those used for Tenderfoot requirement 9) in your everyday life. Spiritual Social
Tenderfoot Rank [PROGRAM STEP] Second Class Rank [PROGRAM STEP] First Class Rank [PROGRAM STEP] Star Rank Requirements [PROGRAM STEP] Life Rank Requirements [PROGRAM STEP] Eagle Rank Requirements [PROGRAM STEP]

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